The UK looks to be suffering a post Election hangover

FX markets have seen a volatile week. A week in which the USD suffered heavily but managed to claw back partial losses after many high tier releases including non-farm pay rolls, UK General Elections and Fed Chair Janet Yellen speaking. This week markets will continue to digest last week’s turbulence, in particular the Conservatives victory in the UK elections. We also have key data released in the form of German GDP, UK labour data, Mark Carney’s speech and US consumer data.

Monday

Busy start to the week as the delayed (due to the UK election) BoE meeting takes place with no change expected. In addition, the Eurogroup meets in Brussels with the aversion of a Greek tragedy high on the agenda.

  • Eurogroup meeting
  • BoE meeting

Tuesday

The UK’s secondary sector releases its numbers and is expected to continue growing, albeit at a slower pace than last month. Meanwhile news wires from the ECOFIN meeting and US job opening numbers will keep the market interested.

  • UK Manufacturing production
  • ECOFIN meeting
  • US JOLTS job opening

Wednesday

Big day for Sterling as the UK employment numbers are set for release. However, the big event will be the BOE inflation report which the market will decipher for clues on when interest rates will go up. There will be additional interest after two members stated they were close to voting for a hike last month. In the US the retails sales will keep the market busy.

  • German GDP
  • Bank of England inflation report
  • UK Unemployment rate and average earnings
  • US Retail sales

Thursday

Slightly quieter day on Thursday but the US jobless claims will be scrutinized after last week’s non-farm payrolls.

  • US Unemployment claims

Friday

Given the backdrop of sentiment in the US at the moment, Friday’s data will be analysed by the hawks for any signs of hope for a June interest rate hike. The markets have pushed this back to September but the Fed have left the door ajar.

  • US Empire manufacturing
  • US Industrial production
  • US University of michigan consumer sentiment